Research on internet dating failures

In fact, this latest proclamation on the state of modern love joins a 2010 study that found more couples meet online than at schools, bars or parties.And a 2012 study that found dating site algorithms aren’t effective.Surely online dating has fed this trend in part, providing the constant buffet of alternative options that sociologists say plays a large part in determining whether a relationship fails; but at the same time, apps like Tinder could never have caught on if people weren’t already approaching sex and dating more casually.It’s a bit of a chicken-or-egg problem: maybe online dating has made us more cavalier, or maybe our growing casualness fed online dating, or maybe these things both exist together in a miasma of hook-ups and right-swipes and shifting social standards.That’s not much different from your neighborhood bar, except in its scale, ease of use and demographics.But in terms of actual function, the things we think of as uniquely “online” in online dating — the algorithms, the personality profiles, the “29 dimensions of compatibility” — don’t appear to make too much of a difference in how the enterprise “works.” Meanwhile, all this is happening during a time of enormous revolution in the way we conceive of relationships and commitment.

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Some of the reasons for that ambiguity are clear in this latest study.And yet, just this week, a new analysis from Michigan State University found that online dating leads to fewer committed relationships than offline dating does — that it doesn’t work, in other words.That, in the words of its own author, contradicts a pile of studies that have come before it.And a 2013 paper that suggested Internet access is boosting marriage rates.Plus a whole host of dubious statistics, surveys and case studies from dating giants like e Harmony and Match.com, who claim — , even!!

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