Research about dating in internet jang geun suk dating 2017

In fact, several dating services encourage participants to "'update' their profiles to reflect personal changes that have occurred since they first posted their profiles" (Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Mc Cable, 2005, p739).

Starling (2000) reported: "It's easy to make up an identity in cyberspace.

One such developing interest to researchers is the way humans create and re-create their personal identities.

An individual's identity can be defined as the "cognitive and affective understanding of who and what we are" (Schouten, 1991, p413).

Within the realm of Internet dating additional research should be conducted on ways individuals choose to re-frame their identities in light of the potentially artificial environment that dating anonymously might elicit.

Previously conducted research has suggested that virtual reality is enveloped within physical reality.

More dramatically, Hollander (2004) indicated that the human need to oversell "reflects the pressures of a competitive culture and a competitive market place of personal relationships…especially [among] older women who are even more often without partners" (p75).

Moreover, Internet dating can be viewed as a potential advancement of the use of new technologies in the postmodern world.

Marked by constant change, postmodern society now "infiltrates every sphere of social life" (Morgado, 1996, p44).

Moreover, Wurf and Markus (1991) predicted that the re-construction of identity "involves a multi-step process of development, validation, and redevelopment" (cited in Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Mc Cable, 2005, p738).

The context of Internet dating offers individuals opportunities to explore their possible selves online and offline and at the same time; Internet dating allows individuals to use a combination of online and offline behavior and feedback to re-create their identities.

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