Dating metamorphic rocks

Some techniques place the sample in a nuclear reactor first to excite the isotopes present, then measure these isotopes using a mass spectrometer (such as in the argon-argon scheme).

Others place mineral grains under a special microscope, firing a laser beam at the grains which ionises the mineral and releases the isotopes.

The isotopes are then measured within the same machine by an attached mass spectrometer (an example of this is SIMS analysis).

This is a common dating method mainly used by archaeologists, as it can only date geologically recent organic materials, usually charcoal, but also bone and antlers.

This technique is good for iron meteorites and the mineral molybdenite.

This system is highly favoured for accurate dating of igneous and metamorphic rocks, through many different techniques.

Radioactive decay is a natural process and comes from the atomic nucleus becoming unstable and releasing bits and pieces.

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All rely on the fact that certain elements (particularly uranium and potassium) contain a number of different isotopes whose half-life is exactly known and therefore the relative concentrations of these isotopes within a rock or mineral can measure the age.

Another way of expressing this is the half-life period (given the symbol T).

The half-life is the time it takes for half of the parent atoms to decay.

This technique has become more widely used since the late 1950s.

Its great advantage is that most rocks contain potassium, usually locked up in feldspars, clays and amphiboles.

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